The Suffragette Movement: Radicalization

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The Suffragette Movement: Radicalization

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The Suffragette movement became radicalized when Alice Paul created the Congressional Union in 1913, which became the National Woman's Party (NWP)in 1917. A breakaway group from the umbrella organization The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), the NWP advocated for an aggressive campaign of picketing, speeches and parades to galvanize support for women's suffrage. In this pursuit the NWP was driven by two suffragettes in particular, Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, who became acquainted when working for the suffragette movement in England in the early years of the 1910's. The English Suffragette movement had been radicalized by Emily Pankhurts call for "Deeds not words" in pursuit of women's suffrage. This collection outlines in pictures and articles the English Suffragist movement, its radicalization and the development of the radical suffragist movement in the United States.

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Items in the The Suffragette Movement: Radicalization Collection

Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence, British suffrage leader, and Miss Alice Paul of the National Woman's Party, full-length portrait, standing, Washington, D.C.
The photographed meeting of the English radical Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence and Alice Paul. Paul learned to use the militant tactics of the women's suffrage movement in England and then brought them to America. Paul is on the left and Mrs.…

Alice Paul on force-feeding in England
Alice Paul engaged in hunger strikes when imprisoned for agitating for Women's suffrage in England. This article describes the process and her reaction. "When the forcible feeding was ordered, I was taken from my bed, carried to another room and…

Letter written by Emeline Pankhurst to members of the Women's Social and Political Union(UK), 10 January, 1913, outlining the case for militancy.
Emily Pankhurst derides the suffragists who favor a conciliatory approach to the British political establishment. Ignoring the pledge to consider women's suffrage in the coming days Pankhurst argues that more, not less, aggression was needed to…

The Guildhall Exploit was an assault on the refined world of the English government. Long accustomed to relying on a stubborn style of compromise the British government was slow to recognize the seriousness of the suffragist movement. Smashing…